The Caffeinated Penguin

musings of a crackpot hacker

The worst of player excess

Posted By on February 14, 2014

In contrast to my previous post, this is on when you let players go too far, and it gets out of hand.

David is what one would call a munchkin. He figures out how to make a character that maxes out some aspects of it, and then skimps on other things, not exactly creating “well rounded” characters. This is not really an issue per-se, unless he makes a character that everyone hates.

Anyway, David comes up with this idea of wanting to be an escaped lab experiment, the most prominent feature of which was an Orichalcum cybernetic arm. Now, the issue with this is that, in the world of Shadowrun, Orichalcum is used for magical items (weapons, tools, and the like), and magic doesn’t play well with technology. Plus, it’s tremendously expensive to make. So, you’ve got a guy walking around with cybernetics worth more than most folks make in a lifetime, which stands out like a beacon to anyone magically active (and anyone not magically active can still see it for what is).

So, in order to get this fancy bit of kit. which is not obtainable on the open market, David needed to take a stupid number of character flaws and get GM permission. I gave the GM permission, figuring that the character flaws would make up for it.

Well, they did – in spades.

The flaws were, in short:

  • He was hunted by the people from the lab from which he escaped.
  • He was making side money by recording their capers on his implanted Simsense rig. The more interesting the video, the more he got paid. Him being hunted was a nice GM hook. The Simsense was where it really went sideways.

For the first adventure, I ran the standard “Food Fight” mission, where they end up going for a late run to a local Stuffer Shack. Their snack run is, of course, interrupted by some inconsiderate gangers trying to hold up the joint.

As one would expect, they dispatched the gangers, and then the manager comes out and is very appreciative, and tells them to take whatever they want. No problems – until David’s character grabs the manager and makes like he’s going to cut the manager’s throat. This led to a chorus of “Dude, WTF?”

A couple of other missions like this, and one of the other characters, played by Ross, decided to put a hit out on David’s character.

The thing that you have to realize about Shadowrun is that you don’t necessarily play a “team”, you often play a group of independent contractors held together by a common job or set of contacts. This is not a problem if you decide to not work with someone anymore, because “we’re all professionals here”, etc. This works – right up until one of your team is a vindictive psycho. Hence, the hit.

The hit goes down in the form of a sniper with a rifle shooting at him while he’s sitting in the runners’ local dive bar. They are at a table, playing cards or something. He is at the bar, because he’s a loner.

Now, at the time, I thought it unfair to just do a lethal damage headshot. To be honest, I still do. I perhaps should have made the other player aware that I wasn’t going to GM fiat lightningbolt kill a character – that’s just lame. But, I didn’t.

The bullet comes through the window, shattering it, busts the beer David’s character is drinking, and thuds in to the bar. Combat ensues. David’s guy goes over the bar, everyone else’s characters flip over a table and take cover behind it. Ross’s character goes invisible and draws his katana.

A few rounds go through the table, high, missing people. They’re all taking cover, wondering what to do. Ross’s character vaults the bar – and then cuts David’s character’s head off with his katana.

At this point, David stands up, says thank you very much, and walks out of the game, taking his girlfriend, Lois, with him.

He refused to play as long as Ross was in the the game.

Things to learn as a GM:

  • Be explicit, up front, of PvP is allowed. I was new to this, so I had never assumed that it wasn’t. David was shocked that such a thing was allowed.
  • Don’t execute someone as a GM. It’s lame. I stand by this decision.
  • Don’t let your players play sadistic nutjobs, unless they’re all playing sadistic nutjobs. I should have warned David that this meant that everyone was going to hate him (but, I think he would have done it anyway). Oh, and the final bombshell? They didn’t find out about the Simsense until after all this. It was the catalyst for it because it was a driver of his extreme behavior, but the rest of the group was really not sure what to make of Ross, wondering if they were next – right up until they found that out (I made sure to work it in as a bit of expose later in the plot arc). After that, they agreed that Ross’s character’s actions were totally justified.

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